Practice: Find Your Biases

3 min

Recognizing your own biases can be a challenge.


They're often unconscious, and come in unexpected forms.


Let's play a game that can help you examine those biases.

You're the captain of a sinking ship.


There are six people left on the ship, plus you. But there's only one lifeboat left — and it can only hold four people.


You and three others.

Which of the following three people would you save?

Choose the three people you'd save from the list...


Jennifer, 27: Advanced degree in cellular biology; working on a cure for cancer.
Terrance, 34: Two small children at home and another on the way.
Jordan, 56: Senior executive at a high-powered investment firm.
Angelica, 18: First person from her family accepted to college; starting in the fall.
Cedrik, 6: Angelica's little brother; his first time on a ship.
Vera, 67: Surgeon for many years; recently retired.


...then click Next.

Jennifer, 27... Terrance, 34... Jordan, 56... Angelica, 18... Cedrik, 6... Vera, 67


Who did you choose?
Why did you choose them?

Jennifer, 27... Terrance, 34... Jordan, 56... Angelica, 18... Cedrik, 6... Vera, 67

We all have biases. What are yours?

Jennifer, 27... Terrance, 34... Jordan, 56... Angelica, 18... Cedrik, 6... Vera, 67


Do you value youth over old age?
Contribution to business over science?
Proven results over potential?

Hopefully you will never have to make a decision about who to save, but we do make decisions every day about who we include, listen to, and support.

Examine your biases — the ones that led you to choose people for the lifeboat...

... and the ones that impact the decisions you make every day.

TAKE THE NEXT STEP:


Next time you interact with someone at work, pay attention to what biases you have that impact the way you treat them — either positively or negatively.

Lesson complete

Like what you see? Try us for free!

Check out our full library of 2500+ Microlearning® lessons and try creating your own lesson.  

Sign me up